Tuesday, May 27, 2008

Interview with Henrietta B Harris

q)What is your name?

a)Henrietta B Harris

q) Where do you live and work?

a)Auckland, New Zealand

q)What is your creative process like?

a)Unreliable & varying

q)What is your favorite medium?

a)Oil Paints

q)What is your current favorite subject?

a)Puffer fish

q)How long does it take for you to finish a piece?

a)Anything from 5 minutes to a few weeks. Usual length of time would probably be about 6 hours but my latest abstract pieces take days.

q)What has been your biggest accomplishment so far?

a)2 relatively successful solo shows in 2 years

q)Are there any contemporary artists that you love?

a)Yes, there are many contemporary artists I love, including Esao Andrews, Thomas Campbell, Mattias Adolfsson, Elliot Collins, Ruban Nielson, Raymond Pettibon, Vic Reeves, Christian Marclay, Oliver Jeffers, Jacob Magraw-Mickelson... many many more.

q)Can we buy your art anywhere?

a)I guess at this point in time email me, that is the best thing to do I should say.

q)Anything that people should know about that we don't??

a)I have thought about this question for a long time and find it impossible to answer. Make up the answer yourself.

q)What is your best piece of advice for those who would like to rise in their level of artistry?

a)Go overseas alone for a period of time

q)What inspires you to keep going when the work gets frustrating or tough?

a)My mum, scrapbooking.

q)How do you describe your work to those who are unfamiliar with it?

a)I usually don't, or make up a lie to be honest. 'uh drawings and paintings of really interesting things.'

q)What kind of training did you have which helped you achieve your current level of artistry?


a)Although I spent three years at art school, the training that I found most beneficial for my own practice was that of my 7th form art teacher and the self taught kind.

q)Is there a tool or material that you can't imagine living without?

a)Coffee

q)Who are your influences?

a)The artists listed in the contemporary artist question, Evelyn Waugh, No Age, Chris Morris, Joe Strummer

q)What inspires you to create?

a)I saw that movie 'Elephant' and made a painting the next day inspired by the angle a wall made in the corridor, nothing to do with the storyline. I have also been inspired by plants, buying & experimenting with new materials, small cities made of wood, music.



q)…your contacts…

a)
www.scaredycat.co.nz
henrietta@scaredycat.co.nz

Interview with Marcos Carrasquer




q)Well, first of all please tell us a little about yourself.


a)I LIVE IN PARIS, AFTER HAVE BEEN LIVING IN HOLLAND, SPAIN AND USA; MY FATHER HAD TO LEAVE SPAIN AT THE END OF THE CIVIL WAR: AT SOME POINT, A MAN’S LIFE NEVER STARTS EXACTLY AT HIS BIRTH- IT ALWAYS PRECEEDS THAT-, NOR DOES IT END AT HIS DEATH- IT CAN FINISH BEFORE OR AFTER.


q) Had you always planned on being an artist [or had you other hopes]?

a)I WANTED TO BE GOALKEEPER, UNTILL, DURING A TOURNAMENT, WE LOST 9-0; I WAS ALREADY DRAWING ON ANY FLAT SURFACE I COULD FIND, SO IT WAS CLEAR, SINCE I DIDN’T LIKE SCHOOL AT ALL.

q) Do you have a preferred medium to work on? Why?

a)OIL PAINT AND INK ON PAPER; LATELY I DON’T DO ANY ETCHINGS ANYMORE, ALLTHOUGH I LIKE IT A LOT: BEAUTIFUL BLACKS

q) How would you describe your style?

a)I CAN NOT AND I DON’T THINK I PURSUE ANY

q) Do you go through any certain processes while trying to produce your work?

a)WITH OIL PAINT, I NORMALLY MAKE A VERY ROUGH SKETCH ON PAPER; WHILE PAINTING, QUITE A LOT OF CHANGES OCCUR, THINGS ARE LEFT OUT OR ADDED WHILE PAINTING. STARTING, THE IDEA OF THE PAINTING IS IMPORTANT, BUT ONCE THE WORKING PROCESS IS UNDER WAY, THINGS GET MUCH MORE FORMAL, WITH MOMENTS OF VERTIGO, BUT MOSTLY PROLETARIAN WORKING HOURS

q) What are you working on at present?

a)I JUST FINISHED A BIG PAINTING AND AM MAKING LITTLE DRAWINGS AS A PRELIMINARY FOR NEW STUFF, PAINTING OR DRAWING

q) What about recent sources of inspirations?

a)CAN BE ANYTHING, A PHOTOGRAPH OF A CHOREOGRAPHY, STUFF I SEE ON TV, THINGS READ IN BOOKS OR SEEN ON THE STREETS, ARTHISTORY

q) What are some of your obsessions?

a)RENDERING OF FLESH WITH PAINT OR INK, NOT HAVING ENOUGH TO EAT, THE INSANITY OF CLERGY AND POLITICIANS AND HOW THEY GET AWAY WITH IT

q) Which galleries have you shown at and which galleries would you like to show at?

a)I’M SHOWING AT DEBORAH ZAFMAN IN PARIS AND WOULD LIKE TO SHOW AT THE VATICAN, AFTER IT IS SOCIALIZED

q) If people would like to contact you, how would you like to be

contacted?

a)MAIL


q) Do you have any suggestions or advice for artists that are just starting out?


a)GIVE ORDER(PAINT) TO CHAOS(EYES)


q) Who are your favorite artists?


a)REMBRANDT


q) What books are on your nightstand?


a)-DON QUIJOTE, CERVANTES
-GUERRA, EXILIO Y CARCEL DE UN ANARCOSINDICALISTA, CIPRIANO MERA
-LE LIVRE NOIR, ILYA EHRENBOURG AND VASSILI GROSSMAN


q) To what weaknesses are you most indulgent?


a)DEPENDENCE


q)...your contacts.


Friday, May 23, 2008

Interview with Julianna Bright

q)What is your name?

a)Julianna Bright.

q) Where do you live and work?

a)Portland, Oregon. USA

q)What is your favorite medium?

a)Pencil, gouache, ink and water color.

q)What is your current favorite subject?

a)Since my daughter was born last year, I have less time to work and so I find the process has become very stream of consciousness. When I sit down to draw now, I just take up the pencil and go, and what I seem to be drawing over and over are female figures, arbors, ribbons lacing around half animal, half human beings. There is something pleasurable at the moment about exposing the roots of plants, and painting figures as if they are floating beside these plants. In the past I would confront a project or show with an over arching theme in my mind, hash out some question I hoped to answer. I've had to sacrifice those overt machinations since becoming a mom, and so I think I'm turning over more and more to the subconscious. Also, children do a good deal to force you into inhabiting the moment; life with them is so alinear. This has been particularly interesting for me as an artist and a musician, to trust that whatever energy is there when I have a moment to show up can carry me.


q)How long does it take for you to finish a piece?

a)If I work straight through I can finish a small piece in a long day or two.

q)What has been your biggest accomplishment so far?

a)I'm really proud of the record my partner and I made while I was pregnant with my daughter. (Our band is called The Golden Bears. We released a record this spring and pressed just 500 LPs and decided not to make any cds.) It feels like the music is the closest expression to the stuff I've heard in my head for so many years. And I think the lyrics and artwork I made for the album, all of these things are true expressions of my delight and joy in my life, my family. The lyrics were written very much in anticipation of what it would be like to meet our kid; and it's so great to me that this document exists for our daughter.

q)Are there any contemporary artists that you love?

a)Mostly friends actually. Amanda Eicher. Harrell Fletcher. Jen Smith. Chris Johansen. Donal Mosher.

q)Can we buy your art anywhere?

a)I try to post the pieces that are available through me or a gallery on my website.

q)Anything that people should know about that we don’t??

a)I have four chickens. Is that interesting?

q)What is your best piece of advice for those who would like to rise in their level of artistry?

a)Just keep making things. Practice. I think sometimes we have such a clear idea of what something should look or sound like and then we're frustrated when our facility or the process let's us down. We worry there isn't room in the world for what we do. But I think it's important to quiet those voices and to hold our seats when it feels like our work is betraying us as some kind of fraud. Even the crappiest painting gets you closer to something else.

q)What inspires you to keep going when the work gets frustrating or tough?

a)I'm not frustrated by making art. I get frustrated by time constraints or feeling too exhausted at times, but I'd make the stuff I make even if no one ever saw or heard it.


q)How do you describe your work to those who are unfamiliar with it?

a)Maybe the best way to describe what I do is that I make illustrations from lost or forgotten children's fables.

q)What kind of training did you have which helped you achieve your current level of artistry?

a)None. I'm self trained and just drew and painted and drew until I liked what I was seeing.

q)Is there a tool or material that you can’t imagine living without?

a)Pencil.

q)Who are your influences?

a)My partner is a huge influence on me. He has a very mechanical mind and often alters my perspective in super useful ways. I'm influenced by old photographs, plants, Indian miniature paintings, illuminated manuscripts. The Kinks are my favorite band and Ray Davies has had a huge impact on how I think about music and story telling. (And art as story telling.)

q)What inspires you to create?

a)Just everything. I feel like there's this river that runs underneath everything and all I have to do is make the time to lower my hand into it. I'm alive, that's why I want to make things.


Interview with Stephen Blickenstaff

q) What is your name?

a) My name is Stephen Blickenstaff

q) Where do you live and work?

a) I live and work in Frederick, Maryland in the USA.I've lived in Frederick all my life.I have a day job as a graphic designer for the Frederick County school system.

q) What is your creative process like?

a) When I come up with an idea for a piece, I might just be going over things in my mind until something jumps out. Sometimes I'll have a vague idea of what I want to draw or paint before I start, but other times I'll just start throwing down lines with a pencil or brush. It's very satisfying to watch the image appear in front of me as I work. With most of the acrylic paintings I've been making over the past seven years, I'll start by painting a background. Then I'll create a black abstract shape overtop of the background. Since acrylic paint dries very quickly I don't have to wait very long before I start putting shades of color on top of the black abstract shape. I work with dark colors first and with each step I add lighter tones. I will usually know what direction my painting is heading after I start to apply colors to the black abstract shape. I'll start putting together features and right away I'll have some idea what kind of person or creature it's going to be.With drawing, the process is a bit different. I usually like to do a few very quick small sketches on a piece of scrap paper. Once I've come up with an idea I like, I'll transfer my idea to a larger sheet of drawing paper. With color pencils, I usually work up a tight linear sketch first, and then work over it with thicker black lines. Then I will do lots of shading with darker tones working towards lighter tones. I like to finish up with a white color pencil adding light tones and highlights.

q) What is your favorite medium?

a) That depends on the day of the week. One day I might say pen & ink. Another day I might say acrylic paints or color pencils. I even like working with sculpting clay. I tend to work for a while in a particular medium and then I'll switch to another medium for a while.

q) What is your current favorite subject?

a) It's got to be monsters, although I really enjoy doing pin-up art too.I'm heavily influenced by a lot of the imagery from the 50s and 60s.I was born in the early 60s when stores were full of all kinds of crazy monster toys and stickers, which I collected. I think they made a tremendous impact on the way I perceive things.

q) How long does it take for you to finish a piece?

a) I'm happy if I can finish a painting or a color pencil drawing in 30 minutes to an hour.If it takes longer than that, I'll sometimes find myself getting bored with the piece.If I'm working on a pen & ink drawing, I might spend a lot more time on it because those particular pieces are usually much more detailed.
q) What has been your biggest accomplishment so far?

a) I'd have to say it's the album cover art for The Cramps Bad Music for Bad People.That thing developed a life of it's own. I set up and sell my artwork at shows all the time, and people always seem to recognize that drawing first. I'm sure it's because The Cramps are so very well known and deservedly so. They're amazing! It's an honor for me to have my art connected to them.

q) Are there any contemporary artists that you love?
a) Yes, so many I almost hate to start naming some because I know I'll leave out some who are very important to me. Just to name a few, Basil Wolverton, Bernie Wrightson, Marshall Arisman, Ed Roth, Gary Panter, Robert Crumb, Charles Burns, etc.

q) Can we buy your art anywhere?

a) Yes, I'm constantly working on new pieces and I sell them at conventions, galleries and stores.Along with my original artwork, I also have T-shirts, prints, stickers, clocks, and magnets which all feature my art as well. Eventually I'll have everything up on my web site.I'll be happy to send jpeg files of what I have available to anyone who cares to write to me.My email address is glack@erols.com

q) Anything that people should know about that we don’t??

a) Let's see... I play the theremin with a surf band called The Atomic Mosquitos.I occasionally play drums in a band called The Skeptics (whenever we can get together)I believe in UFOs.

q) What is your best piece of advice for those who would like to rise in their level of artistry?

a) Do what makes you happy. Create for yourself, not others.Draw all the time. Don't worry if your work doesn't look perfect.In time you will develop your skills. You don't have to show others everything you create.Keep some things for yourself.

q) What inspires you to keep going when the work gets frustrating or tough?
a) The only time work gets frustrating for me is when I'm working on a project that is based on another person's ideas, and that person might not really know what they want.Anyone who has ever had a job as a graphic designer has probably experienced this. That's why I'm happy that I can spend my free time working on my own projects.My favorite jobs have always been the ones where the client tells me to do whatever I want.

q) How do you describe your work to those who are unfamiliar with it?

a) Most people say I draw lots of eyeballs and teeth. I guess that's a pretty honest way to describe most of the work I do.I work in several different styles depending on my mood, but most of my work does seem to have a horror/comedy theme.

q) What kind of training did you have which helped you achieve your current level of artistry?

a) I'm self taught. I was planning on attending an art college but wound up getting a job as a graphic designer right out of high school and have been working there ever since.It payed the bills and allowed me enough free time to work on my own projects when I got home.I have a total love of creating the art that I do, so I'm always working on something.

q) Is there a tool or material that you can’t imagine living without?

a) Sure, pencils and pens. I take them with me everywhere I go.I feel the need to draw or doodle all the time. I'd probably have a panic attack if I couldn't find something to sketch with when the urge hits me.

q) Who are your influences?

a) I listed some artist's names before, but I'd have to say my two major influences, who I've admired all my life, are Basil Wolverton and Bernie Wrightson.I've drawn inspiration from them since I was a young kid. I used to collect comic books illustrated by them before I even knew who they were. I didn't know anything about them but I recognized their unique styles. I constantly find myself being influenced by the work of other new artists as well.

q) What inspires you to create?

a) Anything can inspire me, the work of other artists, a good film, or even some old piece of scrap metal in the street.Being near large bodies of water, the ocean, a lake or river can inspire me.

q) …your contacts…

a) I can be reached by email at glack@erols.com

My mailing address is

Stephen Blickenstaff,
16 Frederick Avenue,
Frederick,
Maryland, 21701,
USA

Tuesday, May 20, 2008

Interview with Diego Tolomelli

q)What is your name?

a)Diego Tolomelli

q)Where do you live and work?

a)I live and work in a popular and lively area of East Rome

q)What is your creative process like?

a)Sometimes I start from an image or a picture and sometimes I sketch freehand. Once I've found a subject and I've drawn the composition deciding how best to use the lead, I set about choosing glass colours and texture that will give life to the window.

q)What is your favorite medium?

a)Mouth-blown glass is my favourite medium, the textures and colours are unique in every single sheet. Often the glass itself suggests a detail for the design, or even a new project.

q)What is your current favorite subject?

a)Queer art

q)How long does it take for you to finish a piece?

a)Size, cutting, and the amount of painting are factors affecting time. In the windows I do, 60% or more of the time, is taken up with painting. This process is quite complicated and involves each piece of glass being fired several times.

q)What has been your biggest accomplishment so far?

a)There are two things I am really pleased with, the first was bringing stained glass on to the dance-floor at a Queer night in Rome, the second was getting a chapter dedicated to me in an gay erotic novel by William Maltese. He commissioned the St. Bartholomew window and really loved it.

q)Are there any contemporary artists that you love?

a)Pierre et Gilles, and Gilbert and George.

q)Can we buy your art anywhere?

a)Yes, contacting me via my website is the best way,commissions and existing panels.


q)Anything that people should know about that we don't??

a)Stained glass does not belong to the Church, stained glass was the only solution in Medieval times to the problem of putting glass in big windows. At that time all glass was mouth blown and so couldn't be made very big. The art form comes from the need to communicate to the illiterate masses,in churches stained glass showed pictures from the Bible,and in castles the aristocracy used their cotes-of-arms.

q)What is your best piece of advice for those who would like to rise in their level of artistry?

a)Keep your eyes open, practice a lot and be daring.

q)What inspires you to keep going when the work gets frustrating or tough?

a)My boyfriend always finds the right words.

q)How do you describe your work to those who are unfamiliar with it?

a)I normally describe it as classical leaded and painted stained glass, with a queer theme.


q)What kind of training did you have which helped you achieve your current level of artistry?

a)Originally I took a short stained glass course, which gave me the basics. The bulk of my training was in a big stained glass studio, which specialised in restoration so I got to see hundreds of different artists, (medieval through contemporary), and work on some really interesting new projects.

q)Is there a tool or material that you can't imagine living without?

a)My badger brush, I use it for shading - it's goes against 5years of vegetarianism and activism in Greenpeace, but it lasts a life-time and I hope that the people that make them simply shave the badger.
q)Who are your influences?
a)I am Italian so I have to say the Renaissance period, but I love and admire the Irish stained glass artist, Harry Clarke- he was daring with this medium.

q)What inspires you to create?

a)It's quite hard to explain what inspires me to create. Everytime it's different. I can give you a couple of examples, in the piece "Woman in Corsage", it was the pattern in the lace stockings that made me want to turn this image into a panel;with "A Thrillology of Cock", it was a pair of boxer-shots.Naked bodies are obviously inspiring, but this medium works best with colours, contrasts and details.

q)your contacts.

Thursday, May 15, 2008

Interview with Justin "Scrappers" Morrison

q)What is your name?

a)Justin "Scrappers" Morrison

q) Where do you live and work?

a)I live and work in Portland, Oregon

q)What is your creative process like?

a)I collect junk, read books, listen to music and then sit down and try to fit all the things I love together. It's like making a puzzle.

q)What is your favorite medium?

a)I like to work with house paint because it's so thick and gooey. I also happens to be pretty cheap and free most of the time as people tend to give me their unused house paint once their done painting their kitchens and bathrooms.

q)What is your current favorite subject?

a)I like to make art that reflect the Pacific Northwest culture that I live in. The forest, the animals, the loggers, the hippies and stuff.

q)How long does it take for you to finish a piece?

a)Not long. I work on 5-6 pieces at a time and can finish them all in under a week. House paint is thick so you don't have to build up layers, it keeps things simple and bold.

q)What has been your biggest accomplishment so far?

a)Maybe this interview? Any time some one I don't know looks at my art and says they like it, I feel like I've done something big and good.
q)Are there any contemporary artists that you love?

a)J. Otto, Barry McGee, David Byrne, Marc Bell, Steve Powers, Bwana Spoons,Apak, Os Gemeos and all my buddies at Grass Hut.

q)Can we buy your art anywhere?

a)Sure. I have a show at Giant Robot NY next month and I always have stuff up at Grass Hut in Portland.

q)Anything that people should know about that we don't??

a)I'm gunna be a papa. My wife has a baby in her belly and I really want to name it Camper if it's a boy or Flora if it's a girl.

q)What is your best piece of advice for those who would like to rise in their level of artistry?

a)Don't work for money or fame. Stay honest. Have fun. Work to create more good in the world.

q)What inspires you to keep going when the work gets frustrating or tough?

a)Other work. If I hit an obstical I'll work on something else for a while to get my mind off of it and a solution usually comes up once I stop thinking about it.

q)How do you describe your work to those who are unfamiliar with it?
a)Urban Hipster Folk Art


q)What kind of training did you have which helped you achieve your current level of artistry?

a)I studied history, environmental ethic and advertising, so I have a lot of ideas. I don't having any art training, so I don't have any limitations.I'm free to make anything I want.

q)Is there a tool or material that you can't imagine living without?

a)New music. I can't do anything without new music in my ears.

q)Who are your influences?

a)Everyone.

q)What inspires you to create?

a)The fear of death with out triumph.


q)…your contacts…

Wednesday, May 14, 2008

Children No More

....hello guys!!!....Well,I'll partecipate with other artists to this show:

CHILDREN NO MORE-
- matite contro la violenza sui minori -
a cura di Alessandro Dezi e Fiorenza Filippi
per conto della Karibu Onlus


3 -15 June 2008
Galleria Comunale
SpazioGiovani
Via Venezia, 41 - Bari
Orari: 10.00 - 12.30 / 16.00 - 21.00


byyyyyyyyyyyeeeeeeeeeeeeee!!!
Claudio Parentela
www.claudioparentela.net

Tuesday, May 13, 2008

Interview with Kate Malone

q)What is your name?

a)Kate Malone

q) Where do you live and work?

a)I live and work in East London and in Provence. Two studios combined with two homes.

q)What is your creative process like?

a)It varies, but I usually have a thought that usually comes to me when I am not thinking about it, then I follow a small idea through to a clay piece, and if it is interesting that starts the evolution of a series of pieces. I have different series going on at the same time.

q)What is your favorite medium?

a)Clay, raw clay.

q)What is your current favorite subject?

a)Nature, and crystalline microscopy.




q)How long does it take for you to finish a piece? This varies, but an average piece might take 30 hours over a period of six weeks.

q)What has been your biggest accomplishment so far?

a)Still being enchanted at the thought of working.

q)Are there any contemporary artists that you love?

a)Andrew Logan.

q)Can we buy your art anywhere?

a)No, exclusively through my only Art Dealer…Adrain Sassoon

q)Anything that people should know about that we don’t??

a) I am looking for a place to set up a third studio-home in Barcelona.

q)What is your best piece of advice for those who would like to rise in their level of artistry?

a)To persevere, to follow the most enjoyable elements of what you do...just get on with it.

q)What inspires you to keep going when the work gets frustrating or tough?

a)Letters I get form school kids who like my work, and that I need to earn a living for my family.

q)How do you describe your work to those who are unfamiliar with it?

a)Pieces that show just a fraction of the wonder of nature and the alchemy of ceramics. Pieces that make you feel secure and feel good.

q)What kind of training did you have which helped you achieve your current level of artistry?

a)Six years of specific training in ceramics, a BA then an MA at the Royal College of Art. My education was during a time when there was a good supply of materials and great teaching and money was not scarce within the system.

q)Is there a tool or material that you can’t imagine living without?

a)A rubber kidney.

q)Who are your influences?

a)Mother nature, Andrew Logan, my Art Dealer and clients, friends and family.

q)What inspires you to create?

a)The Clay and the joy of working.



q)…your contacts…

a) My e-mail, or my Art Dealer.

Thursday, May 8, 2008

Interview with Cornelia O’Donovan

q) Well, first of all please tell us a little about yourself.

a)Hello my name is Cornelia O’Donovan; I live and work in London. I trained in Theatre Arts and Production and I have a First in Visual Communications. Last June I received a Masters from the Royal College of Art. I love animals! All of them.

q) Had you always planned on being an artist [or had you other hopes]?

a)It just seemed to turn out this way!I have a constant need to make things. If im not making things I feel wierd. Before my postgraduate study at the Royal College of art I trained and was commissioned in different areas of Illustration, Design and Printed Textiles. I have done a lot of related study to my work. I prize the commitment needed and experimentation aspect of further education. Also I love cooking, if I wasn’t an artist I would like to cook.


q) Do you have a preferred medium to work on?

a)I love the endless possibilities of a new piece of paper, the sizes, textures, and big paper on a roll. Walls are good too; I’ve painted on buildings. I use a wide range of materials- sewing to 3D sculptural pieces. I love stationary!

q) How would you describe your style?

a)Hand made, fantastical D.I.Y

q) Do you go through any certain processes while trying to produce your work?

a) It’s a poetic mix from technique and narrative. My research starts in a 'documentary' spirit Collecting, writing, reading and from a catalogue of ideas grows to large scale, more detailed piece, at the moment mostly collages and drawings.

q) What are you working on at present?

a)I like to try a bit of everything. A new set of limited edition screen prints for my shop. A commissioned hand sewed English sheep dog! I have been commissioned to make a set of dolls house interiors from paper, collaborating with other artists. I’d to collaborate with a ceramicist. I’d like to make more hand painted wallpaper.

q) What about recent sources of inspirations?

a)Urban landscapes, Superstition, folklore and the day to day... In Prague I saw a church made of bones. Cycling in the great outdoors! Seriously I love to swim it keeps me focused, Drawing everyday is a lifestyle choice and needs a lot of Discipline. I am really keen to explore cross-disciplinary collaborations, and I work with other artists and groups in the UK and worldwide.

q) What are some of your obsessions?

a)Making things at home. My mother taught us to make so many things with our hands.

q) Which galleries have you shown at and which galleries would you like to show at?

a)This April I had a show In Wales, the biggest collection of my work I shown to date, called Fauna and Folly. It was a selection of ceramic pieces some really large-scale collages and new drawings.You can see pictures of the gallery and work on my blog. I’d like to paint some backdrops and buildings.My work has been shown on the Alternative London Fashion week and printed worldwide in the World of Interiors Magazine.

q) If people would like to contact you, how would you like to be contacted?

a)Email or an old fashioned letter is nice.


q) Do you have any suggestions or advice for artists that are just starting out?

a)Keeping a visual record of your ideas to refer back on, it’s a personal mythology to turn to when you don’t know where to go next. Keep on Keeping on!

q) Who are your favorite artists?

a)There are so many! Some that I constantly fall in love with are Niki de Saint Phalle, Kate Malone, Chris Johanson, Olle Eksell, Sara Fanelli, Kaffe Fassett, and Peter Doig.

q) What books are on your nightstand?

a)The Bedside book of birds by Graeme Gibson, The Neon Bible by John Kennedy Toole, The Diary of Frida Kahlo, A confederacy of Dunces by J. Kennedy Toole again

q) To what weaknesses are you most indulgent?

a)Gosh- Probably a lot of Impulse and little bit of Selfishness.


q)…. your contacts…

Interview with Jason Polan

q) Well, first of all please tell us a little about yourself.

a)I am from Michigan. I wear glasses. I like sending mail to people I like.

q) Had you always planned on being an artist [or had you other hopes]?

a)I wanted to be a professional baseball player and also a professional basketball player. I have always liked drawing though.

q) Do you have a preferred medium to work on? Why?

a)I like drawing with different pens. I think my favorite surface is plain typing paper. It is usually available. I also like painting directly onto walls.

q) How would you describe your style?

a)I am not sure. I try to do all different things. I am not sure about my style.

q) Do you go through any certain processes while trying to produce your work?

a)Yea. Usually I will think of an idea first; a visual of something in its completed form. Then I will spend all of my time trying to solve it. I will try to make something as close to what I initially intended as possible. Sometimes I think of a title first. That is usually for a book. After the title I will work on illustrations or other things (collecting clippings from newspapers or magazines, or photographs, or text) and compile these things until there are enough for a book and then I will make it.
q) What are you working on at present?

a)I just made a book with Derek Erdman, and one with Shawn Creeden, and Michael Worful and I are making a book of photographs that will be done soon. I am working on some other books too. I am also doing a project called The Drawing Project right now. I have been doing it for the past 161 days. I post a new drawing each day and send it to the first person who responds after the post. I also just started a project called Every Person in New York, where I am trying to draw every person in New York. People can email me if they would like meto draw them somewhere and then they may see themselves on the blog that evening. I am trying to post the drawings pretty regularly. I am also a member of the Taco Bell Drawing Club!

q) What about recent sources of inspirations?

a)A lot of different things: Things I eat are inspiring. I am also inspired by a lot of different people, artists, engineers, cooks, and scientists. I get ideas on airplanes sometimes.

q) What are some of your obsessions?

a)Collaborating with people on things, eating, the mail, and collecting things.

q) Which galleries have you shown at and which galleries would you like to show at?

a)Lump gallery/projects (http://www.lumpgallery.com/ ) was most recent.I want to show work at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

q) If people would like to contact you, how would you like to be contacted?

a)Through mail:

Jason Polan
P.O. Box 15
Prince Street Station
New York,
NY 10012
U.S.A.

Or Through email:

Art at Jason Polan dot com

q) Do you have any suggestions or advice for artists that are just starting out?

a)That is what I am. I do not have any advice.
q) Who are your favorite artists?

a)
Derek Erdman
Rich Jacobs
Bill Thelen
Michael Worful
Eric White
Alex Toth
Todd Hido
Jordin Isip
Jay Ryan
Gary Panter
Jason Fulford
David Shrigley
Hatte Hamilton
Miranda July
Sol Lewitt
Phil Frost
Mike Mills
Bruce Bickford
Tucker Nichols
Tom Sachs
David Greenberger

q) What books are on your nightstand?

a)There is a magazine with a horse on it. Right now I am reading the book Frankenstein!

q) To what weaknesses are you most indulgent?

a)I wish I worked harder.
q)...your contacts.





Monday, May 5, 2008

Interview with Derek Erdman

q) Well, first of all please tell us a little about yourself.

a)I am short and have short person complex. I am fond of junk food, sleeping and meeting new people. I also have favorite clothing that I wear all of the time, like I will find a favorite soft shirt and wear it all of the time. Lately my arms have been moving involuntarily, I think I am developing Tourrette's Syndrome. My teeth are in terrible shape, they are all rotting out of my mouth. I will not go to the dentist because I do not like it there. I hate the taste of flouride rinse and the feeling of metal scrapers. My life's work can be attributed to trying to impress my father who left me at birth.

q) Had you always planned on being an artist [or had you other hopes]?

a)I didn't properly plan in any way for my future, nor am I now. I would like to live near an ocean eventually. I don't think of myself as an artist now, I think of myself more as a huckster.

q) Do you have a preferred medium to work on? Why?

a)I like to make paintings with housepaint on wood. All of these things can be bought very cheaply.

q) How would you describe your style?

a)EASY. Something that is easy to do, simple. I try to avoid the complex at all costs.

q) Do you go through any certain processes while trying to produce your work?

a)I like to listen to music. I used to drink red wine or vodka but I don't much anymore. I work on a schedule called 36-12, I stay up for 36 hours and then sleep for 12. During hours 20-30 I get really great ideas. During hours 30-36 I am totally useless.



q) What are you working on at present?

a)I am going to paint things on insulation foam, cut them out and hang them from the ceilings of my house.

q) What about recent sources of inspirations?

a)Which Way Books, Kaspar Hauser, books and films from my childhood. I also like to research old medical books with line illustration, or any reference book really.

q) What are some of your obsessions?

a)Doing the dishes, keeping my home organized. It's dusty but straight. I also love the music group The Fall. In college I was really into Morrissey, I wore big sweaters and wooden beads and stuff.

q) Which galleries have you shown at and which galleries would you like to show at?

a)I haven't really shown in many galleries, I'm not really interested in it. It rarely seems like an inviting atmosphere. I have shown at Unitard in L.A., Yellow Wall Hall, Shooting Gallery SF, Intoxicated Demons in Berlin. I have something currently at the PowerHouse Arena in Brooklyn NY.

q) If people would like to contact you, how would you like to be contacted?

a)Email = derek.erdman at gmail dot com



q) Do you have any suggestions or advice for artists that are just starting out?

a)Get to work, you can't do something until you do it. I would add to avoid most education and refrain from using your "art" as a social device.

q) Who are your favorite artists?

a)Jason Polan, Amy Casey, Hannah Woodroofe, Tom Tierney, maybe Nick Vandermolen.

q) What books are on your nightstand?

a)I don't read books.



q) To what weaknesses are you most indulgent?

a)Sometimes I am lazy. Also I am also at times selfish and mean to people.

Sunday, May 4, 2008

Interview with Michael Pajon

q) Well, first of all please tell us a little about yourself.

a)I am 28 years old, the son of a Colombian immigrant and a Southside Irish lass. I grew up 45 minutes outside of Chicago in a working class home surrounded by cornfields. So with little to do besides ride your bike I often found myself reading comic books and drawing.

q) Had you always planned on being an artist [or had you other hopes]?

a)Well, my father always wanted me to play soccer, and I loved it, but it quickly took a backseat to my other hobbies as I began to realize how hard it would be to have a go at pro soccer in the States. Besides, I had started way too late and by the time I was in High School there were younger kids who were better than me. My Mom wanted me to be an engineer since I always enjoyed building things and taking them apart, but I am terrible at math and find it utterly boring, so that became a no go as well.

q) Do you have a preferred medium to work on? Why?

a)I arrived at collage making through printmaking, which is kind of strange, but I think they are both very process oriented mediums, so it wasn’t a stretch. I think both printmaking and collage offer a very democratic approach to art making. With printmaking you have multiples of an image, and that allows you to get it out to more people. Collage may be the most democratic art form of all; anyone can do it, though I do draw into all of my pieces.

q) How would you describe your style?

a)Well recently over the weekend at the Chicago Art Fair I had quite a lot of people refer to it as Americana. Which I guess is appropriate since all of the pieces that make up the collages are various scraps of old ticket stubs, matchbooks, postcards, and maps from the 1800’s – 1950. It is very narrative, and I had a friend tell me that hey often read like Aesop’s Fables or Allegories.

q) Do you go through any certain processes while trying to produce your work?

a)Most often I have to go out to junk shops and thrift stores to appropriate new materials. I go through quite a lot and very often there is an image that anchors the rest of the piece that I need to make or find to get started. Then I have to find a surface on which to work, most recently I completed a piece that is sort of a scrolling Darger-like narrative on an old children’s book that I took apart. In that piece, and with most others, the background is too busy so I traced around the figures and cut some old notebook paper to disrupt the foreground. The piece in question is called “Jimmy’s Adventures in the Inland Empire”.

q) What are you working on at present?

a)I have the rest of that children’s book already stretched out on my desk. I am really enjoying making these larger pieces. So far I have made two, until then most of them were no larger than a book page.

q) What about recent sources of inspirations?

a)We have this Edward Hopper show up in Chicago, and I’ve now visited the show twice and plan on going again tomorrow. It is beautiful. Hopper has such a way with creating these lonesome everyman characters in his paintings. To me they seem to represent a certain failure of the American Dream, which is a constant them in my work. I’ve also been spending a lot of time reading about quilting and the generational story passed down in the patterns and quilts. It’s pretty fascinating, there is a group of women in Boykin, Alabama who have been quilting since their families were plantation slaves and were moved there from North Carolina in 1846. The a symmetrical designs in their quilts go all the way back to their African heritage

q) What are some of your obsessions?

a)Well I am a complete nerd so I have to say right now re-reading my Hellboy comics and keeping up with Battlestar Galactica. I’ve also had this Band of Horses album Cease to Begin on repeat for a while now.

q) Which galleries have you shown at and which galleries would you like to show at?

a)I have had some work shown with Adam Baumgold Gallery in New York, and Ann Nathan Gallery here in Chicago. Pavel Zoubok’s gallery in New York has a focus on collage and to be amongst some of the greats like Joseph Cornell, John Evans, and Mark Wagner. I also really enjoy the work at Richard Heller gallery in Los Angeles.

q) If people would like to contact you, how would you like to be contacted?

a)They can contact me through my website, www.michaelpajon.com. It’s just little old me so drop me a line.

q) Do you have any suggestions or advice for artists that are just starting out?

a)Make the work you want to make and do not fret creative dry spells. If you work through them you’ll be a stronger artist for it. Don’t ever let someone else’s opinion of your work effect what you do, especially if you know it is true to you.

q) Who are your favorite artists?

a)Contemporary artists; I’ve really been enjoying Mark Wagner’s work; he makes collages out of cut up dollar bills. He is also a co-founder of a Booklyn in Brooklyn, NY. I also really enjoy Jonathan Schippers work, who is a kinetic sculptor, also in Brooklyn, his recent immense piece called “The slow and steady decline of American Muscle” was a spectacle to behold. Two full-sized muscle cars are forced together by two hydraulic pistons at ¾ of an inch an hour, it looks like an extremely slow motion car crash.
I have always been a huge fan of Goya, Edward Hopper, Aubrey Beardsley, Hieronymus Bosch, Max Beckmann, Otto Dix, and Joseph Cornell.

q) What books are on your nightstand?

a)I’m reading the Moviegoer by Walker Percy. I have been to New Orleans a few times I the last 6 months and it tells the tale of a misanthrope by the name of Binx Bolling who believes his life is without enough “treasurable moments” and often searches for authenticity in a place where there is little, Hollywood films.
Recently I finished reading Malcolm Gladwell’s “Blink”. It’s a quick read, and offers some fascinating insight into how we make snap judgments.

q) To what weaknesses are you most indulgent?

a)Movies, I am going to see Iron Man tonight. I also get a little more excited than I should when I see a red Netflix envelope in the mail.
The other is bike rides, we’ve been having some gorgeous weather until today, and it has been hard to get work done in the studio when all I want to do is go out for a ride.

q)….your contacts…

Thursday, May 1, 2008

Interview with Jaakko Pallasvuo

q) Well, first of all please tell us a little about yourself.

a)I can't really think of much. I'm just some random person. I like drawing and painting. I listen to a lot of music. I've drawn some comics and taken a lot of polaroids recently.

q) Had you always planned on being an artist [or had you other hopes]?

a)I wanted to study at the university and be a barber for a while when I was about five or six years old. Later I wanted to be unemployed. I think planning on being an artist kind of grew out of the desire of being unemployed.

q) Do you have a preferred medium to work on? Why?

a)It changes a lot, but at the moment I really like painting and drawing with ink on paper. It's something about the black ink colour being so rich. And that the technique is so instant.

q) How would you describe your style?

a)Hmm, I kind of don't want to have a "style". Or I guess I have a style, but I don't want to self-define it since that would be narrowing down my possibilities. I want to keep open the option of being a completely different person tomorrow.

q) Do you go through any certain processes while trying to produce your work?

a)I often watch TV or listen to music while painting or drawing to distract myself and just let it happen.

q) What are you working on at present?

a)I'm trying to do a book of really weird and dark but also some mellow and pretty ink drawings. I'm also gonna paint some more big paintings in a while.

q) What about recent sources of inspirations?

a)Bands like Gang Of Four, Wire, The Slits, Mika Miko, X-ray Spex, Beat Happening. Clothes by Gareth Pugh. Small towns and the nature surrounding them. Travelling by train. Some classic movies like Casablanca and The Third Man.


q) What are some of your obsessions?

a)Observing the way people behave in social situations. Random people's faces. The way people dressed during certain decades. Light-situations.

q) Which galleries have you shown at and which galleries would you like to show at?

a)I had my first solo show at the Napa Galleria in Helsinki a couple of months ago, which was really nice. I can't really think of another specific gallery I would like to show at. There are a couple of nice small ones in Helsinki I wouldn't mind. And a super-prestigious one in New York would be fine with me too! But I also like the idea of showing at an abandoned building somewhere or not showing at all, so I guess what I'm trying to say is that at the moment I don't care too much!

q) If people would like to contact you, how would you like to be contacted?

a)E-mail.

q) Do you have any suggestions or advice for artists that are just starting out?

a)I consider myself just starting out too, so I don't really know. What has helped me a lot is to pay as little mind as possible to outside pressure and to have a certain kind of D-I-Y attitude. Just make stuff happen!


q) Who are your favorite artists?

a)There are a lot and they change a lot, but I'd say Marlene Dumas, Fra Angelico, Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Grandma Moses, Karin Mamma Andersson, Louise Bourgeois, Wolfgang Tillmans, Christian Schad, Philip Guston, Matt Lock, Pauliina Mäkelä, Daniel Clowes, Diego Velázquez etc.

q) What books are on your nightstand?

a)Beautiful Losers by Leonard Cohen, Fragments by Baudrillard and The New York Trilogy by Paul Auster.

q) To what weaknesses are you most indulgent?

a)Being a snob, not being appreciative enough.


q)….your contacts…